Money Expressions with Two Operations

Students will learn to solve money problems with two or more operations.

Teaching Objectives:

  • Students will learn to define an expression.
  • Students will learn to write expressions to solve problems.
  • Students will write expressions and solve problems with two or more operations.

Suggested Grade Level

6th – 9th Grade

Lesson Excerpt:

What is an expression?

A numerical expression is a mathematical phrase that has numbers and operations in it. A variable expression is a mathematical phrase that has numbers, operations and variables in it.

You may be wondering what an expression has to do with money; well many times there are problems that need to be solved regarding money. When this happens, we need to think about how to express the problem in a mathematical way so that we can solve it. This is where using an expression comes in.

Let’s look at an expression that has one operation in it.

Example:

Kyle is shopping for a present for his mother. He has decided to buy her four new coffee cups. After searching all day, he finally selects a set that he likes. Unfortunately, he has to buy each cup separately. One cup is $5.00. If Kyle purchases all four cups, how much will he spend?

 

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The Gold Rush – Impact and Expansion

Students will learn about various gold rushes, including the California, Colorado, and Alaska Gold Rushes.

Teaching Objectives:

  • Students will understand of the major events surrounding the California, Colorado, and Alaska Gold Rushes.
  • Students will understand the impact of the Gold Rushes on western expansion in the U.S.
  • Students will understand many important issues surrounding U.S. territorial expansion.

Suggested Grade Level

6th – 8th Grade

Related Standards (from McREL’s Standards Compendium) :

  • S. History Standard 9: Understands the United States territorial expansion between 1801 and 1861, and how it affected relations with external powers and Native Americans
  • S. History Standard 10: Understands how the industrial revolution, increasing immigration, the rapid expansion of slavery, and the westward movement changed American lives and led to regional tensions
  • Language Arts Standards 4: Gathers and uses information for research purposes
  • Language Arts Standards 7: Uses reading skills and strategies to understand and interpret a variety of informational texts

 

Overview of Lesson:

  1. Students read about of the California, Colorado, and Alaska Gold Rushes using either their textbooks or the information provided here.
  2. Students complete the chart comparing the three Gold Rushes.
  3. Students work in small groups to conduct further research on one of the three Gold Rushes and create a report and visual aid to demonstrate their research.

 

Time Needed for Lesson:

1 class period for reading, discussion, and completion of chart. The report and visual aid will require another 3-5 class periods.

 

Major Points of Emphasis

  • Gold is a precious metal which has been used for thousands of years as a source of currency and wealth.
  • Although a frenzy accompanied each of the three Gold Rushes discussed here, they did much to open up Western territories to settlement and development.
  • As prospectors hurried to find gold, they created a need for more goods and services in the West, causing many others to follow their lead and leading to the rapid development of many regions of the country.
  • The prospectors endured many hardships along the way.
  • The Gold Rushes caused changes to the geography of the regions they took place in and affected the Native American populations already present on the lands.

 

Lesson Excerpt:

Gold was first discovered in Northern California, very close to the city of San Francisco. The actual location of the discovery was Sutter’s Mill at a place where the American and Sacramento Rivers come together near the Sierra Nevada mountain range. James Marshall, who had been hired by John Sutter to build a sawmill on his land, was the first to find a golden nugget on January 28, 1848. After testing it, he learned that it was indeed real gold. Although he only told a few people because he wanted to keep his finding a secret, this was not to be.

Throughout 1848 the news spread, at first locally, and then throughout the state, the country, and the world. The news started a frenzy in which people madly rushed to California to search for gold and instant wealth. Throughout 1849, people came from all over to search for gold, often traveling thousands of miles and facing terrible hardships along the way. The “49ers,” as they were called, came by land and by sea; both U.S. citizens and immigrants came in search of wealth and opportunity. By the time that the majority of the prospectors had arrived, however, they found that most of the gold had already been taken.

 

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Writing Expressions with Different Money Amounts

Students will learn to write and evaluate expressions that have different money amounts.

Teaching Objectives:

  • Students will review writing expressions.
  • Students will review evaluating expressions.
  • Students will write expressions with different money amounts in them.
  • Students will evaluate those expressions.

Suggested Grade Level

6th – 9th Grade

Lesson Excerpt:

What is an expression?

An expression is a numerical statement that has variables, numbers and operations in it. An expression is not an equation. An equation is looking to be solved. There is only one solution to an equation. An expression is evaluated. Depending on given values, there may be more than solution to an expression.

Here is an example of an expression.

Example:
12y

This expression means that we are multiplying 12 times an unknown number.
This expression could describe a situation involving money. Here is an example.

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Writing Expressions Involving Money Amounts

Students will learn to write expressions using money amounts.

Teaching Objectives:

  • Students will review evaluating expressions.
  • Students will review expressions verses equations.
  • Students will learn to write expressions to evaluate money amounts.

Suggested Grade Level

6th – 9th Grade

Lesson Excerpt:

What is an expression?

An expression is a numerical statement that has variables, numbers and operations in it.  An expression is not an equation. An equation is looking to be solved. There is only one solution to an equation. An expression is evaluated. Depending on given values, there may be more than solution to an expression.

Here is an example of an expression.

Example:

5x+6

Five times some unknown number plus six.

We don’t know what the unknown number, or variable x is, so we aren’t sure what the value of the expression is. Notice that we don’t have an equals sign. This expression isn’t an equation. It is an expression.  Because we haven’t been given a value for the variable, this is as far as we can go with this expression.

We can write expressions.

Using what we know about expression, we can write an expression to describe a particular situation.  Let’s look at an example.

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Car Loan Application

In this lesson students practice filling out a sample car loan application.

Teaching Objectives:

  • Learn how to fill out a car loan application

 

Suggested Grade Level

7th Grade – 12th Grade

Lesson:

Students should first search advertisements for a car that they are interested in purchasing. Next, fill out the car loan application form.

 

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For Plant Lovers Only: Becoming a Botanist

Learn what botanists are, where they work, and how a person can become a botanist.

Teaching Objectives:

  • Students will be able to explain what a botanist is and what kinds of activities a botanist might do.
  • Students will be able to describe five sub-specialties in the field of botany.
  • Students will be able to name places where a botanist might work.
  • Students will be able to explain how a person can become a botanist.

Suggested Grade Level

5th – 8th Grade

Lesson Excerpt:

Botany is the study of plants. A scientist that works with plants is known as a botanist. Botanists do many different things in a wide variety of settings. They study plants to find out how they can best be grown and thrive. They study properties of plants that make them useful as medicine, and they do research to learn about the nutritional value of plants as well. Botanists also develop ways to use plants to make things like building supplies and fibers for clothing.

Botanists may work indoors or outdoors, depending on the specific job they do. They work with farmers, in nature museums and in laboratories. Many work in colleges and universities, where they teach and do research. Government organizations hire botanists as well. For example, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Parks Service are two large employers of botanists. Drug companies, paper and lumber companies, food companies and seed companies also hire botanists.

 

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A Career with Bugs: Becoming an Entomologist

Learn what entomologists are, where they work, and how a person can become an entomologist.

Teaching Objectives:

  • Students will be able to explain what an entomologist is and what kinds of activities they might do.
  • Students will be able to describe two sub-specialties in the field of entomology.
  • Students will be able to name places where an entomologist might work.
  • Students will be able to describe how insects can be problematic as well as how they are beneficial.
  • Students will be able to explain how a person can become an entomologist.

Suggested Grade Level

5th – 8th Grade

Lesson Excerpt:

An entomologist is a scientist that studies insects. Sound creepy? Perhaps, but for an entomologist, the world of butterflies, bees and mosquitoes is both fascinating and rewarding. Entomologists work in research labs, for health departments and in colleges and universities. One of the most important things these scientists do is to help prevent the destruction that insects can cause, such as damage to buildings or the devastation of crops. But not all bugs cause problems. Entomologists also find out how some insects are helpful to the environment. For example, ladybugs feed on insects that might destroy crops, while field crickets eat some common household pests. Bees provide us with honey and beeswax, which is used to make candles, cosmetics and household products.

Some entomologists specialize in working with specific kinds of insects. For example, lepidopterists work with butterflies and apiculturists raise bees. An entomologist that studies how insects behave in a certain environment and how they affect other organisms (including people) is called an ecological entomologist.

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Consumer Privacy – Overview & Awareness of Issues

In this lesson students and consumers are provided with a general overview and awareness of privacy issues that impact their lives.

Teaching Objectives:

  • Define what is meant by privacy in the information age
  • Explain the pros and cons of database profiles
  • Understand federal laws that offer privacy protection
  • Identify public and private sector sources of information
  • Understand key privacy issues as they relate to information sources, insurance, employment, direct mail, credit reporting, telecommunications, electronic monitoring, and Social Security numbers
  • Explain how to remove your name from mailing and telemarketing lists
  • Explain how to obtain a credit report

 

Suggested Grade Level

7th Grade – 12th Grade

Lesson Excerpt:

In today’s information age, keeping your personal financial information private can be challenging. What you put on an application for a loan, your payment history, where you make purchases, and your account balances are but a few of the financial records that can be sold to third parties and other organizations.

This lesson will discuss how public and private records are accessed and used by various organizations, as well as review privacy laws to protect your information.

Direct mail, credit reports, telecommunications, and Social Security numbers will be considered from the standpoint of what consumers can do to protect their privacy rights.

In addition, students will learn about their options as a consumer and ways to “opt out” of database profiles. Students will also learn about privacy in the workplace and the various issues related to their personnel files, electronic mail monitoring, and laws to protect their rights.

 

Teacher’s Guide

Teacher’s Guide

 

Presentation Slides

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Student Activities:

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In Trouble – Dealing with Financial Difficulties

In this lesson students will become aware of the warning signs of financial difficulties.

Teaching Objectives:

  • Describe some of the ways you can get in trouble using credit
  • Explain the first steps to take if you can’t pay your bills on time
  • Describe the debt management services provided by nonprofit credit counseling centers
  • List some of the promises made by “credit repair” companies
  • Understand how to evaluate a “credit repair” company before deciding whether or not to use its services
  • Understand the protections provided by the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act
  • List and understand the wage garnishment and repossession rights of creditors
  • Understand the difference between straight bankruptcy and the wage-earner plan
  • Understand the disadvantages of using bankruptcy as a solution to debt
  • List the ten types of debt that are not affected by bankruptcy

 

Suggested Grade Level

7th Grade – 12th Grade

Lesson Excerpt:

The material in this lesson will help students become aware of the warning signs of financial difficulties.

When difficulties arise, students should first contact their creditors. Next, efforts should be made to revise spending patterns. In addition, assistance from a member of the National Foundation for Consumer Credit service agencies might be considered.

What if these actions do not help? In the next sections of the lesson, students will examine other actions that might be considered, such as debt consolidation loans and bankruptcy. Students should also be aware of fair debt collection practices and wage garnishment.

 

Teacher’s Guide

Teacher’s Guide

 

Presentation Slides

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Student Activities:

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Saving & Investing – Making Choices

Introduce the advantages and disadvantages of common savings and investment vehicles, and show the short and long term effects of various savings and investment choices.

Teaching Objectives:

  • List and prioritize some of your short- and long-term budget goals
  • List and explain some of the advantages of saving money
  • Understand the concept of “pay yourself first” and list some ways to encourage this habit
  • List and explain the differences among the most common saving methods
  • Understand the advantages and disadvantages of popular investment vehicles
  • Understand what investment fraud is, and list some of the ways you can protect yourself against investment swindlers
  • Compare and contrast the short and long term consequences of investment decisions

 

Suggested Grade Level

7th Grade – 12th Grade

Lesson Excerpt:

Saving just 35 cents a day will result in more than $125 in a year. Small amounts saved and invested can easily grow into larger sums. However, a person must start to save.

This lesson provides students with a basic knowledge of saving and investing. The process starts with setting financial goals. Next, a commitment to saving is discussed.

Various savings plans are available to consumers. These include regular savings accounts, money market accounts, and certificates of deposit (CD). Then, students will analyze factors to consider when selecting a savings account. These include interest rates, fees, balance requirements, and deposit insurance. Investing takes saving one step further in a person’s financial plan. Bonds, stocks, mutual funds, real estate, and retirement accounts are covered in the next section of this lesson.

Finally, students are made aware of potential investment frauds. The variety of these swindles increases each year as con artists look for new opportunities to separate people from their money.

 

Teacher’s Guide

Teacher’s Guide

 

Presentation Slides

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Student Activities:

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